Healing What I Did Not Realize Was Wounded: Part I

Goddess, Goddesses of the Americas, Mexico, Priestess, ritual

Sometimes I don’t even realize I am wounded. There have been many times in my life that I have known that I was wounded and sought healing from divine beings, and for those healings I am eternally grateful. But there have also been times when I was healed eventhough I didn’t even realize I was wounded, and the healing from such moments is truly exquisite grace. This happened on my last two visits to Mexico.

In the summer of 2016, Veronica Iglesias and I lead a tour to Mexico City. Part of this tour was visiting the lands and monuments to thirteen Nahua Goddesses. Veronica took us to a site that I had never visited before, Xochitecatl. From about 700 BCE to 900 CE, and even beyond into the Colonial Era (after 1697 CE), this beautiful ceremonial center was dedicated to women’s rituals, and the energy of the Goddesses Xochiquetzal and Chalchiuhtlicue infuses the land with beauty.

Though I have known of Xochiquetzal for many years, I did not consider myself a devotee. However, when I look over my life as a belly dancer, burlesque performer, priestess, feminist, academic, and general lover of flowers, colorful garments, jewelry, and all that brings beauty to the world, I can see Her touch in my life at every turn. That afternoon at Xochitecatl, She came to me and began a healing of what I had not even realized was wounded.

Lying on the grass in front of the Pyramid of the Flowers, Veronica lead a guided meditation. As often happens, I cannot remember a word of what she said. But I remember the moment I awoke in my mind’s eye, dressed for ceremony and part of a grand procession to the base of the steps of the pyramid. I looked down at my beautifully embroidered quechquemitl, and felt the rustle of feathers in my headdress. Heavy stone jewelry weighed on my neck and wrist. I looked up into the sun, watching it descend over the horizon of the snowcapped volcano, Matlalcueitl (La Malinche), Lady of the Blue Skirt.

As is the way with visions, I have memories of participating in ritual and ceremony, being undressed and washed and purified. But the most vivid moment was when Xochiquetzal appeared to me. I knelt before Her, naked. She very gently sang to me and laid me out on my back, my body held by each leaf of all of the plants underneath me. Then She wrapped me in white fibers, enfolding my entire being in a cocoon. I think I remember Her closing my eyes. What I remember most distinctly is falling into the embrace of deep rest.

When Veronica called us back, I was of course reluctant to return. But, as Michael Harner once told me, our job is to go and come back. So I returned to the present moment, still wrapped. And I stayed in that cocoon until a year later, when Xochiquetzal came to me again.

To visit Xochitecatl in person, join Sacred Tours of Mexico for a Women’s Retreat in the Heart of Mexico, Puebla and Cholula November 2017. For more about the sacred side of Mexico, join our Facebook group and sign up for our newsletter.

AwarIMG_6430d winning writer Anne Key is the co-founder of Sacred Tours of Mexico. She has been traveling and researching in Mexico since the late 1980’s. With a Ph.D. in Women’s Spirituality, Anne brings both her expertise and love to each tour. Her dissertation and articles on Mesoamerican Goddesses are frequently cited sources for their feminist focus. She is the author of two memoirs (Desert Priestess: a memoir and Burlesque, Yoga, Sex and Love: A Memoir of Life under the Albuquerque Sun), co-editor of Stepping into Ourselves: An Anthology of Writings on Priestesses and The Heart of the Sun: An Anthology in Exaltation of Sekhmet. She is a co-founder of Goddess Ink.

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Greetings for Beltaine, the First Day of Summer!

Beltane, Goddess, Priestess, ritual, sacred sites, Seasonal Greetings

Greetings! Tomorrow (Thursday) is the First Day of Summer, the cross-quarter day between Spring Equinox and Summer Solstice, often called Beltane or May Day. If we think of the summer as the Season of the Light, then we can see that now it is definitely lighter in the mornings (am I the only one waking up at 5am?).

One European tradition is the maypole, a lively celebration which includes circling a tree with ribbons in hand, which mirrors the growth and verdant fecundity of the season. Though we don’t have a maypole, our flowers, shrubs, and trees are blossoming and leafing, bringing the feeling of life, hope, and joy to my heart.

Snakes also enter in the celebrations at this time of year. The sun warms the stones, and the snakes begin peeking out. In some parts of Italy, snake processions still take place.

My snake Asherah and I have been spending a lot of time together lately. She is awakened from her winter slumber and ready to dance in the season. As I held her last night—her long body coiled around my waist, spiraling up my chest and head atop my shoulder—I was reminded, once again, of wholeness. Snakes live in the ground and climb high atop trees, connecting us from the underworld to the heavens above. When she holds me, I feel whole, connected to deep within the earth all the way to the stars above. And within myself, I am united from my base to crown chakra.

Take a moment today to revel in the beauty of the verdant abundance that surrounds you. Dig your feet into the earth, feel the strength from your base, and let your crown chakra bloom, sparkling like star-fire in the night sky.

Bright  Blessings! – Anne

Note on Dates: Traditionally Beltane is celebrated on May 1st or the eve before. Astrologically, the First Day of Summer may be calculated as the date the Sun is at 15° Taurus (Tropical system), which currently Falls around May 4th to 5th.

What the Goddess Brigit Means for Women and Men Today by Mael Brigde

Brigit, Compassion, Divine, Goddess, Priestess, ritual

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Why has the Goddess Brigit become so popular, and with so many different kinds of people?

Apart from a lull in her popularity in the last century*, Brigit has always been beloved, especially among the Irish and Scots—and where they have migrated churches bearing the name “Saint Brigit’s” or “Saint Bride’s” have popped up with great regularity. So many Irish girls were baptized with her name that its diminutive—Biddy—came to apply to Irish women generally (not in the most flattering way, at all times, but that’s another story), just as their men became known as Paddies, after Saint Patrick.

Brigit’s fortune seems ever on the rise. Her appeal has spilled out beyond the pews and holy wells. Irish social justice and peace activists have adopted her**,  feminists, Celtic revivalists, and environmental activists look to her for inspiration, scholars are penning tomes and journal articles about her, Orthodox iconographers are painting her, Wiccan priestesses are making room for her on their altars and in their rituals, and Celtic Reconstructionist NeoPagans are exploring her literature and myth and offering their insights to the world. Indeed, interfaith orders like the Daughters of the Flame are dedicated solely to devotion to Brigit.

Why???

The diversity of Brigit’s traditions and lore are part of the explanation. In the fleeting mentions of the goddess, wisdom, poetry, healing, smithcraft, motherhood, grief, lamentation and other vocal expressions are touched on. These alone encompass vast portions of life, and their symbolism may be applied to much more again. The stories of the saint range from those of female independence to miraculous abundance, peacemaking, and generosity—and so on and on. Coming from a background of bondage, as reported in her later Lives, her understanding of and tolerance for oppression speak to those who themselves have experienced or witnessed oppression.

Brigit has both antiquity and modern cultus on her side. Goddess and saint, fire and water, bird and fish, wild and cultivated life are all a part of her tapestry. She frees captives and listens to the mad and the lost. If once her flame was kept only by women, today it is tended by men as well; the LGBTQ communities find sympathy with her in her gender-challenging life choices and her friendship with a nun named Darlughdacha; Catholics cherish her commitment to the protection and guidance of her people; pro-choice activists point to the story of St Brigit causing a foetus to disappear *** as for support for their stance.

Brigit is not all things to all people—she is distinctly and utterly herself (her selves?)—but she offers immense scope to those who seek her out.

To learn more about Brigit, please explore Mael Brigde’s Courses on Mystery School of the Goddes

* A recent article in Irish Central reminds us of this, saying, “St. Brigid is the female equivalent of St. Patrick in Ireland, but there are no parades in her honor, and apart from the St. Brigid’s Cross, her name is hardly known…Growing up in Ireland we were all told about St.Brigid’s cross made of rushes which became in many ways a national symbol, used by RTÉ, the national broadcasting company, for one. But we learned little about Brigid herself.” From “Why Irish women should follow St. Brigid, not just St. Patrick”, Niall O’Dowd.

** From the website of Action From Ireland (AFRI): “Féile Bride happens annually in Kildare around the start of Spring in February. The first Féile Bríde was organized in 1993. It is a time for celebration and reflection in spirit of Brigid’s message of justice, peace and hope which remains as vibrant and as relevant today as it was more than a thousand years ago.” http://www.afri.ie/key-events/

*** Cogitosus  wrote, “Brigid, exercising the most potent strength of her ineffable faith, blessed her, causing the foetus to disappear, without coming to birth, and without pain”.  Another might point to the next line, “She faithfully returned the woman to health and to penance” as less than complete support for the issue.


Sources:

Action From Ireland (AFRI). http://www.afri.ie/key-events/

Liam de Paor, translation and commentaries. “Cogitosus’s Life of St Brigid the Virgin”, Saint Patrick’s World: The Christian Culture  of Ireland’s Apostolic Age (1993) pg 211.

O’Dowd, Niall. “Why Irish women should follow St. Brigid, not just St. Patrick”, Irish Central. @niallodowdFebruary 01,2016 01:00 AM. http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/irish-women-should-follow-st-brigid-not-just-st-patrick-189219961-237561981.html

Mael Brigde is a Priestess of the Goddess Brigit and a Writer. She is the Founder of the first interfaith Brigidine flame-tending group, the Daughters of the Flame.

Mael Brigde on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mael.brigde

Daughters of the Flame (flame-keeping group): http://www.obsidianmagazine.com/DaughtersoftheFlame/index.htm

Brigit’s Sparkling Flame (general Brigit blog): http://brigitssparklingflame.blogspot.ca/

Stone on the Belly (Brigit poetry blog): http://stonebelly.blogspot.ca/

Photo Credit:  Shutterstock

Good News and Learning in the New Year

Classes, Compassion, Creativity, Divine, Empowerment, Goddess, Learning, Priestess, ritual

shutterstock_44937577“Everyone has inside of her a piece of good news. The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be, how much you can love, what you can accomplish, and what your potential is.” — Anne Frank

The good news is that we all have the potential to do wonderful things in our life.  But  if you are like me, you don’t always have the current capacity the know how or the tools to move to the next level.  A couple of years ago I put myself on a financial literacy self learning program.  I wanted to be able to communicate and understand my finances in a way that I did not have in my younger years.  It was not easy.  I bought books, signed up for courses, got email newsletters, even put together a presentation to a group, so I could feel comfortable discussing finances.  Do have have the kind of expertise that an accountant, banker or financial planner has?  No I do not.  But I can sit in a discussion with them, and hold my own.  I consider that a success.

Now, my focus is to bring myself into a level of ease and competence in the area of spirituality and spiritual leadership.  I know I need the support of circles of women (which I fortunately have).  I know I need my own daily spiritual practice, which I do.  But I also need to to continue my learning, about spirituality, about spiritual leadership, about priestessing, about how to manifest the Divine in my life, in ritual and in my work.  One way for me is to find on-line classes that guide me.  One of my favorite resources is Kimberly Moore‘s  http://themotherhouseofthegoddess.com/motherhouse-mystery-school-online-courses/.  I have taken a number of courses, and am always pleased with the results!  Molly Remer,from http://www.brigidsgrove.com/  has a wonderful course called the Goddess Magic Circle, that I highly recommend.  Goddess Ink is offering some wonderful classes on Spiritual Leadership, including the Free Introduction to Priesting Course.  If you are ready to Take the Plunge into Priestessing  , this is an excellent course to develop your priestessing skills.  If you are a Brigit devotee,  Weaving the Protection of Bridgit by Jude Lally might be just what you need, or if you want to read and learn, check out our Brigit Anthology, Brigit Sun of Womanhood.  For those of you with a yearning for more compassion in your life, Sandy Boucher and Kim Moore’s class on Kwan Yin could be just what you need.

The only thing better than education is more education.
Progress to Freedom (1942) by Agnes E. Benedict, American educator,1889-1950

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On a personal note, I have my learning year mapped out.  I have some personal growth courses, Kimberly Moore’s A Year of Sacred Living, some business courses and two photography courses….my learning year is full.  I hope you will join me in learning and expanding your world!

Blessings,

Genevieve

 

Genevieve Mitchell is a Partner with Goddess Ink Publishing.  She is a Priestess, a Seeker, a photo artist, a socially responsible  investor, a mother, a grandmother and a devotee of God/Goddess/Divine/Spirit. You can contact her at genevieve@goddess-ink.com.

Goddess Ink is your source for inspiration for the Divine Feminine. Find books, classes and sacred tours to feed your soul.  For more information and to follow Goddess Ink Blog visit www.goddess-ink.com  or visit us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/goddessinkbooks/.  Also, please sign up for the Goddess Ink Newsletter for a monthly dose of inspiration.

Photo credits:  Shutterstock

On Being A Creation Woman by Kimberly Moore and Genevieve Mitchell

contemplation, Creativity, Divine, Empowerment, Goddess, Gratefulness, Priestess, ritual

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What does it mean to be a Creation Woman?  What does it mean to take my creativity, open it up to Divine inspiration, stir in some excitement and adventure….and head in to 2017?  Where can I find my creativity?  When I find it…then what?   I’m pleased, puzzled, grateful and baffled by the opportunities I have to be creative and impactful.  I also pray that I make wise choices.

It’s the last week of 2016….what a year, personally, professionally, politically and providentially.  As as Creation Women, women and men with the power to create the world in which we want to live, it’s time to honor that creative capacity.  Creativity is the powerful flow from the universe, it’s the energetic force infusing our lives.  This creative flow, comes from Source, and manifests as Divinity in all manner of our creations.  Our own creative potential is evidence to me that God/Goddess/Source exist…because we manifest that creativity in the mystery of living and in the creation of art, music, dance, ideas….the building of amazing building, the collaborative efforts to solve world problems, the creation of new technology….

Creativity is everywhere!  Let us celebrate it, honor it, and use it, to create a world where there is respect and honor for the Earth, humanity and all our relations to the seventh generations. So how can we use ourselves as Temples of Creativity?  Kimberly Moore from MotherHouse of the Goddess and Mystery School of the Goddess, shares some profound and very timely observations.   Thank you Kimberly!

 

“Breathe Me, Woman, into your head, your thoughts, your intentions.

Breathe Me, as I breathe you into Creation.

Breathe Me deep, Woman, into your womb, your throne. Lay me bare on

your heart, your altar. 

Let us embrace as Sisters on our thrones of Creation.

Give Me your seeds and let us laugh over them, pour tears into them, hold silence unto them.

Let us set them gently onto our thrones, adorn them, infuse them.

Let us clasp our hands on our bellies and feel them growing, kicking, burgeoning.

And when the time is ripe and our thrones are bursting,

Let us crouch and moan and rock.

Let us birth these seeds grown strong with intention, with our beauty, with our secret Selves.

Give me your Creation – I am your Midwife.  I am your throne.  I am the receiving Earth.

Breathe Me, Woman.  Breathe Us into Creation.

Creation Woman calls upon us to claim our thrones. Unite with our divine soul seeds, to unveil our life mission, fight for our heart’s desire, to “bleed” with purpose. She is not to be ignored and if done, can result in pathologies such as depression, anxiety, and even more serious illnesses. 

This month, part of your sacred living work is to work on your Temple, your throne. Notice where it needs work. Adorn it. Breathe into it daily, mindfully, powerfully. In this, you are creating your reality, making healthy and vibrant the place that allows you to CREATE. “

~ Kimberly Moore

Kimberly F. Moore is a Creative Catalyst and Mentor for Women; Shakti-Powered Entrepreneur; Goddess Priestess; Blissful Revolutionary; Hungry Goddess (food writer); Writer; and Photographer. She offers coaching and online courses to promote the Everyday Sacred in women’s lives for personally and professionally.

Kimberly is offering her Year of Sacred Living http://mysteryschoolofthegoddess.net/2016/10/17/a-year-of-sacred-living-with-kimberly-f-moore-open/ where she shares a year of Living Deeply with the Sacred.  The poem above is from her course.

She is the Founder of the MotherHouse of the Goddess and Mystery School of the Goddess. Kimberly has been a Goddess Priestess for more than 20 yearsHer areas of research, practice, and teaching are focused on Goddess Spirituality, Comparative Mythology, Archetypal Psychology, and Ritual Practice. She has a special connection to the Goddesses from the Greek, Hindu and Yoruban traditions, but has worked with many other Goddesses through the years.  She is also an Aborisha in the Lukumi tradition and a Daughter of Oshun. Kimberly lives in Delaware with her son, two kitties, surrounded by Goddess altars everywhere.

Genevieve Mitchell is a Partner with Goddess Ink Publishing.  She is a Priestess, a Seeker, a Flower Essence Practitioner, a photographer, a socially responsible  investor, a mother, a grandmother and a devotee of God/Goddess/Divine/Spirit. You can contact her at genevieve@goddess-ink.com.

Goddess Ink is your source for inspiration for the Divine Feminine. Find books, classes and sacred tours to feed your soul.  For more information and to follow Goddess Ink Blog visit www.goddess-ink.com  or visit us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/goddessinkbooks/.  Also, please sign up for the Goddess Ink Newsletter for a monthly dose of inspiration.

Photo Credits:  Top Photo by Kimberly Moore, bottom photo by Shutterstock.

Mid Winter and Solstice

Divine, Empowerment, Goddess, Priestess, ritual, Solstice

shutterstock_242072233I want to start out this post with the phrase “the mid-winter of my discontent.” But I do not want to let the beautiful darkness and stillness of the Winter Solstice devolve, filling the cave of my mind with fears, worries, anxiety and nightmare scenarios, driving out all possibility.
The winter solstice marks the shortest day and the longest night of the year. The sun appears at its lowest point in the sky, and it literally stills, rising and setting at its southernmost position on the horizon the few days before and after Mid-winter.
It is in the stillness of this time of year that I find solace. When I am lucky enough to be surrounded by snow, it seems as if the earth is silent – slumbering and dreaming. It is a time I love to be in bed early and gaze out the window at the velvet darkness, the bright stars and moon punctuating the sky.
I usually look forward to this time of year, to the stillness, the silence, the time to incubate and dream. But, as I said at the beginning of this post, I keep fending off the specters of political futures. It seems I am either lost in Shakespeare or Dickens.
But at this moment, here on the precipice of the solstice and on the edge of stillness, held and embraced in the gentle darkness, I open to the long night. I open petal by petal, a night-blooming flower, and trust in the deepest beauty that I know imbues this world. I trust in the love that lives deep in the molten core of our Mother. I simply must.
Deepest Blessings of the Season to you. — Anne
Note on Dates: Astrologically, Mid-Winter may be calculated as the date the Sun is at 0 degree Capricorn. Winter Solstice (Latin: “sun ceases”) is known as Midwinter or Yule (from the Germanic and possibly Norse)

Award winning writer Anne Key is the author of two memoirs. The first, Desert Priestess: a memoir, relates the three years she spent as Priestess of the Temple of Goddess Spirituality Dedicated to Sekhmet, located in Nevada. Her second, Burlesque, Yoga, Sex and Love: A Memoir of Life under the Albuquerque Sun, recounts her time in Albuquerque performing under the stage name Annie O’Roar. She is co-founder of Goddess Ink

Goddess Ink is your source for inspiration for the Divine Feminine.  Find books, classes and sacred tours to feed your soul.  For more information and to follow Goddess Ink Blog visit www.goddess-ink.com  or visit us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/goddessinkbooks/.  Also, please sign up for the Goddess Ink Newsletter for a monthly dose of inspiration.

Photo Credits: Shutterstock

What Now? Reflections on Moving Forward by Sidni Lamb and Genevieve Mitchell

Compassion, contemplation, Divine, Empowerment, Goddess, Learning, Loss and Grief, ritual

2014-1-tamaya-big-sky“All shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well.” –Julian of Norwich

In the bigger spiritual picture, “all shall be well” and we are indeed, okay.  The Divine, however we define It, Her or Him, is SO much bigger than us, our community, our nation or our earth.  The Divine is unknowable to us…., knowing that, yes, we are okay.

So, why don’t we feel okay?  Many of us have feelings of pain, distress, heartache, sadness, fear and shock about recent political events in the nation.  There’s grief and a sense of loss that makes us feel wounded and anguished, for our nation and for ourselves.  Both during and as a result of the election, it has become painfully obvious that many of us have not felt heard or acknowledged.  So, how do we move on in this very challenging climate?

What now?

  • Deepen Your Spiritual Practice– Take time to find the core of your spiritual practice.  It could be meditation, ritual, praying, chanting, sitting in circle, celebrating in community. Find and attend to something that connects you to the Divine, to your sacred center.
  • Be In Nature–  The Japanese call it forest bathing.  Connect with the natural world, a tree, a park, go to the mountains, watch a rainstorm, be with the larger, deeper force of nature, the spirit of our holy Mother Earth.
    • “You should sit in nature 20 minutes a day, unless you are too busy, then you should sit for an hour”– Old Zen Saying
  • Connect to Kindness– Offer or exchange a smile, offer a small act of kindness, ask or give a hug, call a friend.  This is our opportunity to be of service to a world in need of kindness and compassion.
  • Feel Your Emotions–  Be aware of what you are feeling, allow those feelings, honor them, exactly as they show up.  In the same way, allow others to be where they are with their feelings, even if you don’t agree with them. Everyone processes in a different way.
  • Practice Good Self Care– It is time to take very good care of yourself.  Eat well, get plenty of rest, care for your physical and emotional needs. When we have filled ourselves, when we are compassionate and caring of ourselves, we can respond more compassionately to others.
  • Take a News or  Social Media Retreat–  Turn off the news, turn off the radio, take a vacation from Facebook.  Allow time for silence.  Give time to others face to face, instead of digitally.  Allow yourself rest from the outside media influences, allow yourself time to heal.
  • Find Something To Do Right Now–  For some, it will be to write letters, sign petitions, participate in protests.  For others, sitting still, helps us with our creative juices and finding direction for the “what now”.

Taking a purposeful pause to deepen our practice, take care of ourselves and to be kind allows us to get grounded for the hard work ahead.

Sidni Lamb is the founder, visionary and motor behind Mindful New Mexico and the New Mexico Leaders in Mindfulness Conferences.

Sidni’s work and passion focuses on connecting people to their communities and building bridges for collaborative relationships across all sectors and disciplines through mindfulness-based capacity building training, curating conversations for meaningful connections and teaching peace studies courses.

Genevieve Mitchell is a Partner with Goddess Ink Publishing.  She is a Priestess, a Network Weaver, a photographer, a socially responsible  investor, a mother, a grandmother and a devotee of God/Goddess/Divine/Spirit. You can contact her at genevieve@goddess-ink.com.

For more information and to follow Goddess Ink Blog visit www.goddess-ink.com  or visit us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/goddessinkbooks/.  Also, please sign up for the Goddess Ink Newsletter for a monthly dose of inspiration.

Photo Credit: “New Mexico Sky” Genevieve Mitchell

Pondering Priestessing

Divine, Goddess, Learning, Priestess, ritual

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What does it mean to be a Priestess?  What is required?  What are the skills and talents you need to be a Priestess?  What tools are necessary to master to walk, talk, act and stand as a Priestess?

I’ve been pondering these questions deeply in my own life.  I have a very full life, I am engaged in a variety of business, work, volunteer, community and family endeavors.  My guess is that if you asked people to describe me; very, very few would describe me as a priestess.  Why is that I wonder?….Isn’t my connection to the Divine and the work I do as a woman walking a spiritual path, isn’t that a Priestess role?

I am really quite interested in pondering this question of what it means to be a priestess.  I have Priestess friends, I have Priestess teachers, I’m in a Priestess program,  I lead ceremony, do invocations, give blessings, I set up altars and call in the directions.  Why do I still ponder what it means to be a Priestess?  I don’t have an answer, but I would be interested in knowing what you think.

As a Priestess, I see a big part of my work is bringing the Feminine Face of the Divine into the world.  Here are a couple resources I use to do that work.  I love the book Stepping Into Ourselves:  An Anthology of Writings on Priestesses, edited by Anne Key and Candace Kant.  It’s a wonderful resource, including a whole section entitled TOOLKIT.  I also look to Kimberly Moore’s Mother House of the Goddess for inspiration, resources and wonderful classes.

If you have other ideas, resources or good things to share, please email me at genevieve@goddess-ink.com.

Blessings to all you Priestesses!

Genevieve

 

Genevieve Mitchell is a Partner with Goddess Ink Publishing.  She is a Priestess, a Network Weaver, a photographer, a socially responsible  investor, a mother, a grandmother and a devotee of God/Goddess/Divine/Spirit. You can contact her at genevieve@goddess-ink.com.

For more information and to follow Goddess Ink Blog visit www.goddess-ink.com  or visit us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/goddessinkbooks/.  Also, please sign up for the Goddess Ink Newsletter for a monthly dose of inspiration.

Photo Credits:  Stock Photos

 

 

 

Fall, Learning and New Endeavors

Classes, Divine, Fall Equinox, Goddess, Learning, Priestess, ritual

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It’s the fall ritual, thinking about going back to school, getting new pens and paper, figuring out what you want to learn about, what classes to take and what topics are calling to me.  Where does your soul want to journey as the seasons change, we nestle down to cooler temperatures, changing colors and Equinox?  What are you called to?  Goddess Studies? The Divine Feminine?  Your own course of Women’s Studies?

There’s so much to learn, so many options available.  From the Merriam-Webster’s Learner’s Dictionary:

learn  play

verb \ˈlərn
Simple Definition of learn
  • : to gain knowledge or skill by studying, practicing, being taught, or experiencing something

  • : to cause (something) to be in your memory by studying it

  • : to hear or be told (something) : to find out (something)

I agree, but to me learning is interest driven, interesting, eclectic and at my age, self-directed.  This fall I’ve added two courses to my schedule.  I’m delighted to be taking a Molly Remer course, and a Visionary Priestessing Course with Priestess and MesoAmerican Scholar M. Veronica Iglesias, and you can learn more about her work here.
Learning has been a passion for me since I was very little.  I read every book in the house, pestered my mother to take us to the library on a regular basis and secreted a flashlight in my bed to read after lights were out.  I love learning about things that interest me, photography, art, nature, priestessing, music, cooking.  I love reading biographies, learning about the knowledge,  times,  feelings, events and places that I will never experience.  I am fascinated by the things people do to earn a living (drive a 18 wheeler, work with women coming out of prison, do surgery…).  I love having a new experience, especially with someone who knows about the topic.  Learning by yourself is good, learning with a guide can be magical!
I’d like to share with you that there are a variety of wonderful classes offered by Goddess Ink.  If that isn’t enough to wet your appetite for new topics, see Kimberly Moore’s Mystery School of the Goddess for some wonderful opportunities.
What are your plans for this fall?  New classes?  A new book?  A new project?   I wish your blessings and success in your new endeavors.
May your fall be as beautiful as the fall colors!
Bright Blessings,
Genevieve

Genevieve Mitchell is a Partner with Goddess Ink Publishing.  She is a Priestess, a Network Weaver, a Flower Essence Practitioner, a photographer, a socially responsible  investor, a mother, a grandmother and a devotee of God/Goddess/Divine/Spirit. You can contact her at genevieve@goddess-ink.com.

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Photo Credits:  Stock Photos

 

The Daily Acts of Priestessing

Compassion, Empowerment, Priestess, ritual

The swirl of a cape, the waft of incense, the amber necklace and serpent ring — these are all part of my experience priestessing rituals. In these ritual, I have time to prepare myself to step into the role of priestess, to take up the sacred mantle.

One our recent trip to Mexico of my fellow priestesses reminded me of the daily acts of priestessing. Driving in heavy traffic we passed a car wreck, and she spoke words of ease. I remember thinking that the last thing on my mind were the people involved in the wreck–I was worried about traffic and reaching our destination.

The moments that call for the touch and words of a priestess happen irregardless of my dress and preparation. They happen organically, urging me to swim in the current of life, open to what may happen, rather than my usual habit of driving forward irregardless of what is going on around me. I remember again the words of Jalaja Bonheim:

One of the main ways we (as priestesses) serve our communities is through our daily work….the cashier will sense (that) the thousand daily interactions she has with her customers matter, and have meaning. *

As this morning unfolds, I open to the opportunity of daily acts of priestessing.

Blessings –

Anne

*from “The Path of Priestess and Priest: Initiation into an Ancient Tradition” by Jalaja Bonheim from Stepping into Ourselves: An Anthology of Writings on Priestesses.